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 1 
 on: May 18, 2017, 09:23:39 am 
Started by sscotti - Last post by sscotti
I arrived in Austria (Vienna) on 28 February.  American tourist.  I'd like to extend my stay because I'm thinking about staying in Europe, either to work, study, get married, something like that.  I don't want to overstay my VISA.  Wondering what is the most appropriate way to extend my stay.

Options seem to be:

1.  Apply for an extension (not sure how to do that).
2.  Leave the Schengen region briefly and then come back to Austria.

Any help with that ?

Thank you.

Stephen D. Scotti

 2 
 on: May 17, 2017, 03:07:33 pm 
Started by akhtar.naved - Last post by akhtar.naved
Hello,
My joining (indian citizen) in Sweden was on 1stJune2015, but due to some reason I wanted to started the work from 25th May. I asked verbally to sweden embassy in london, they said you can apply for D-Visa and join the company 5days before. But i forget to take this on written. So it mean I worked in sweden for 5 days on Business D-Visa. Even my company forget to notice about this and gave my salary also
Now its the time of Visa-Extention,

Can anyone have the same situation before or anyone tell me what could happen with this.

 3 
 on: May 17, 2017, 03:01:18 pm 
Started by akhtar.naved - Last post by akhtar.naved
Hello,
My joining (indian citizen) in Sweden was on 1stJune2015, but due to some reason I wanted to started the work from 25th May. I asked verbally to sweden embassy in london, they said you can apply for D-Visa and join the company 5days before. But i forget to take this on written. So it mean I worked in sweden for 5 days on Business D-Visa. Even my company forget to notice about this and gave my salary also
Now its the time of Visa-Extention,

Can anyone have the same situation before or anyone tell me what could happen with this.




 4 
 on: May 14, 2017, 02:18:07 pm 
Started by Alexadam - Last post by Alexadam
Hi everyone, I'm in need of some advise as a matter of urgency

I'm a South African. In July 2016 I applied for a Schengen Visa to go to the the Netherlands, I got issued a visa valid for one month with a stay period of 15 days. Subsequently I went to Netherlands within the period and departed within the period thus no overstay.

In September 2016 I applied for another visa to Netherland and I got issued a visa valid for 1 year with multiple entries,however I was not aware of the 90/180 rule

I arrived In Netherlands mid September 2016, ignorant as I was not knowing exactly how the 90/180 day rule worked, I was under the impression that I could stay for a year without leaving the Schengen area albeit I left Netherlands quite often.

In mid January 2017 I was asked for randomly for identification by police in Amsterdam, so I showed them my passport, I was then informed that in terms of the 90/180 rule I overstayed my visa conditions.

I was referred to the vreemdeling Police and they asked me to come to their HQ the following day at a certain time. I was not detained at all and they actually took me to my place of abode and said see you tomorrow. They were absolutely courteous and I was really impressed.

The following day I went to their HQ and I was sat down formally and the rule was explained to me. I was told that I could leave voluntarily or go through a whole process. I was asked would I leave Europe voluntarily and I said off course.

They then issued me with a letter stating that they have informed me that I have overstayed and that the process was explained to me. The letter also stated that I have agreed to voluntarily leave, however there was stated that I agreed to leave within 28 days of signature of the letter.

I signed the letter and the officer said I will be keeping your passport and I would like you to come and see me once per week.

I said no problem and I weekly went and met him. A week before I had to leave he actually returned my passport to me and said that I should really leave before my time (28days expired) what a gentleman... I'm sure you would agree. He gave me a piece of paper that I had to hand in to the border police at Schiphol on my departure that would give him the proof that I have left.

So when me period was up (28 days) I was at the airport and handed my passport to border police. I was asked to take a seat and after some 30 min my passport was returned to me. I was not informed of a penalty, fine or entry ban.

Further there was no stamps or documents attached in my passport other than the exit stamp with the date on.

Now my question and advice that I need...
If I was to be issued a fine or entry ban would I have received it there at the airport when my passport was returned and or when I departed, would they not have stamped or attached something to my passport?

My visa is still valid for 3 months as from today. Is it safe to assume I could go back to somewhere else in Europe within this period as I have no entry ban fine stamp in my passport?

Could somebody please shed light on my situation

Many thanks
And kind regards

 5 
 on: May 12, 2017, 10:44:33 am 
Started by Oudai - Last post by porsche
Should your return flight be before your visa expires, you are safe. Your friend most likely confused the 6-month passport validity requirement. Some countries (depends on particular country) will not let you enter their territory if your passport expires in less than 6 months.

Come back, let us know your travel experience.

 6 
 on: May 12, 2017, 10:41:44 am 
Started by sebalex - Last post by sebalex
Thanks again for your time and help!

Yes, yesterday I started filling out the application. I just read the articles you shared.
I was kind of worried about whether or not airlines would let me board without a visa even if by law I am allowed to enter the UK with my partner and my spanish residence card. I do think having the EEA permit is better to play it safe and avoid complications.

However, while filling out the EEA permit application, there was a question that asked if my EEA national partner will be accompanying me. You mentioned they have to, so how come they ask a yes or no question, instead of saying ''you can't enter unless they're with you''.

I ask this because I'm traveling mostly to visit friends and family members living there, and not only does she not know them, she's also not so good in english, which can make the trip less exciting for her, so I obviously prefer traveling alone.

Do you think if I apply for the EEA permit and say my spanish partner is not accompanying me, I will get refused? Because I don't understand why they'd put that option to being with...

thanks again for all the help:)

 7 
 on: May 12, 2017, 10:40:33 am 
Started by Doubleaxs - Last post by danisara
Hi, there are two aspects of your stay and your question.

a) The 90/180 Schengen visa rule. The 180 days period is not fixed at some starting date, it is a moving period. Today, you look back 180 days and count how many days you have spent in the Schengen zone. Tomorrow, you look back 180 days and count how many days you have spent in the Schengen zone. The day after tomorrow, you again look back 180 days and count how many days you have spent in the Schengen zone. Therefore, starting your calculation either from Fenruary 18th or April 21st, both calculations would be false.

b) Having tourist visa subsequent to student Schengen visa. In this case, if your tourist visa is subsequent to your student visa, then the days you stayed in the Schengen zone under your studnet visa do count toward the 90-180 rule. See this thread for more details on this topic:

Does duration of stay increase with 2 simultaneous Schengen visas?
http://www.maxi-pedia.com/forum/index.php?topic=1042.0

 8 
 on: May 12, 2017, 10:29:25 am 
Started by sebalex - Last post by danisara
By the way, see here for more details:

Code:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eea-family-permits-eun02/eea-family-permit-eun02

Let us know how your travel went and whether you had any issues entering the UK.

 9 
 on: May 12, 2017, 10:24:18 am 
Started by sebalex - Last post by bugibar
The EEA family permit is defined in The Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations No. 1003 of 2006. See PART 2, EEA RIGHTS.

Code:
Right of admission to the United Kingdom

11.—(1) An EEA national must be admitted to the United Kingdom
if he produces on arrival a valid national identity card or passport
issued by an EEA State.

(2) A person who is not an EEA national must be admitted to the
United Kingdom if he is a family member of an EEA national, a family
member who has retained the right of residence or a person with
a permanent right of residence under regulation 15 [b]and produces on arrival [/b]-

   (a) a valid passport; and
   (b) an EEA family permit, a residence card or a permanent residence card.

(source: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/1003/pdfs/uksi_20061003_en.pdf)

Then, the regulation defines what happens if you do not have an EEA family permit:

Code:
(4) Before an immigration officer refuses admission to the United Kingdom
to a person under this regulation because the person does not produce on
arrival a document mentioned in paragraph

(1) or (2), the immigration officer must give the person every reasonable
opportunity to obtain the document or have it brought to him within a reasonable
period of time or to prove by other means that he is—

   (a) an EEA national;
   (b) a family member of an EEA national with a right to accompany
        that national or join him in the United Kingdom; or

And if you read further in article 12:

Code:
12.—(1) An entry clearance officer must issue an EEA family permit
to a person who applies for one if the person is a family member of
an EEA national and—

   (a) the EEA national—

      (i) is residing in the UK in accordance with these Regulations; or
      (ii) will be travelling to the United Kingdom within six months of
           the date of the application and will be an EEA national residing
           in the United Kingdom in accordance with these Regulations on
           arrival in the United Kingdom; and

   (b) the family member will be accompanying the EEA national to the
   United Kingdom or joining him there and—

      (i) is lawfully resident in an EEA State; or
      (ii) would meet the requirements in the immigration rules (other
           than those relating to entry clearance) for leave to enter the
           United Kingdom as the family member of the EEA national or,
           in the case of direct descendants or dependent direct relatives
           in the ascending line of his spouse or his civil partner, as the
           family member of his spouse or his civil partner, were the EEA
           national or the spouse or civil partner a person present and settled
           in the United Kingdom.

(source: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2006/1003/pdfs/uksi_20061003_en.pdf)

Not having an EEA permit before you head to the UK - you might not get a boarding pass when entering on board of your carrier, and you could experience major delays without one. Depending on the setting at the border, you may be refused entry into the UK if you don’t have an EEA family permit. An EEA family permit makes it easier and quicker to enter the UK. It is free of charge, so considering the fact that you are eligible for one, I would not hesitate to apply. Your partner needs to travel with you. The code defining the EEA family permit does not reflect purpose of travel.

 10 
 on: May 12, 2017, 09:13:29 am 
Started by SJ - Last post by steven
Hi, this has been discussed here, please, see these three threads:

Basic requirements for Schengen visa application
http://www.maxi-pedia.com/forum/index.php?topic=977.msg2646#msg2646

Schengen visa supporting documents
http://www.maxi-pedia.com/forum/index.php?topic=632

Germany job seeker visa documents
http://www.maxi-pedia.com/forum/index.php?topic=928.msg2469#msg2469

Good luck with your application. Let us know whether you were successful in obtaining visa.

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