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Networking

Anything related to computer networking such as network design, security, tools, approaches, and concepts


Difference between shared folder and DFS root

What is the difference between a shared folder and a DFS root? Both a shared folder and a DFS root are Microsoft technologies related to sharing files and folders between users on a network. They both look very similar, but there is a number of differences between a shared folder and a DFS root.

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What is DFS root and how to create one

The What is DFS root question is directly related to the next question someone might ask How to create a DFS root. DFS root is an object in the Microsoft Active Directory system used for sharing files and folders across network. DFS root is the starting point of the DFS namespace.

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What is DFS (Distributed File System)

What is DFS you ask today. DFS stands for Distributed File System and is a technology in the Microsoft shop related to sharing files across networks, specifically across wide area networks. What is DFS is the question every network administrator asks when a boss on one side of the state calls him asking how he can get access to a shared network folder on the other side of the state.

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How to publish shared folder in Active Directory

How to publish shared folder in Active Directory is an easy question with easy answer. Publishing a shared folder in Active Directory relates to making your network resources available to your network users. Publishing shared folders in Active Directory provides flexible resources to your network users and at the same time provides a good way to handle access security.

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Allow shared folders to be published

Allow shared folders to be published is a policy related to allowing network users to share resources on your network. If Allow shared folders to be published is enabled or not configured at all, your users will be able to make their shared folders available to other users across your network through Active Directory. The Allow shared folders to be published group policy is a setting that can help a lot with the management of your corporate shared resources.

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Allow DFS roots to be published

Allow DFS roots to be published is a Microsoft Windows setting; it is a group policy setting which determines whether your network users can publish so-called DFS roots in Active Directory. The Allow DFS roots to be published policy is important not only as a security measure but also from the file management strategy perspective. Allow DFS roots to be published is a setting that can help a lot with the administration of your corporate shared drives.

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Difference between symbolic link and hard link

What is the difference between symbolic link and hard link? Explaining the difference between a symbolic link or a symlink and a hard link is easy and vital to knowing about how Linux/Unix environments work. Understanding the difference between a symbolic link and a hard link is also important for web server maintenance and understanding how modern websites work.

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FollowSymLinks

FollowSymLinks is a directive in your web server configuration that tells your web server to follow so called symbolic links. As one would expect, FollowSymLinks is an acronym for Follow Symbolic Links. FollowSymLinks is a very important setting that plays a role in your website security.

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Grid computing - distributed computing

Grid computing can be defined as a type of parallel and distributed system that enables sharing, selection, and aggregation of geographically distributed autonomous resources. Grid resources are assigned dynamically at runtime depending on their availability and capability.

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How to find MAC and IP addresses in network data

How easy is it to obtain MAC address and IP address from wireless network traffic? We have asked this question and now provide this writeup to demonstrate how vulnerable MAC addressing is as a security measure. Even though the number of users protecting their wireless networks with the MAC filtering technique as the only measure is decreasing, there are still many of them.

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